Cash method taxpayers that stake cryptocurrency native to a proof-of-stake blockchain and receive additional units of cryptocurrency as rewards when validation occurs must include the fair market value of the rewards in income in the year in which the taxpayer gains dominion and control of the rewards, according to the IRS.  Revenue Ruling 2023-14 (the

As 2020 finally comes to a close, it is time to consider year-end tax planning. One bright spot this year has been the performance of cryptocurrencies. Bitcoin, in particular, is trading at or near all time highs, considerably above its previous peak at the end of 2017. Other cryptocurrencies, like Ether, have also had considerable returns this year. Taxpayers holding significantly appreciated cryptocurrency may be considering the best way to optimize their charitable giving. Below we describe the tax benefits of making donations of appreciated cryptocurrency, as well as other tax considerations for both donors and charities.
Continue Reading Charitable Contributions of Cryptocurrency: Tax Benefits and Other Considerations for Donors and Charities

The OECD released a report titled Taxing Virtual Currencies: An Overview of Tax Treatments and Emerging Tax Policy Issues on October 12. The report, which was prepared and endorsed by the 137 members of the OECD’s Inclusive Framework on Base Erosion and Profits Shifting, provides a comprehensive analysis of the approaches and policy gaps across the main types of taxes (i.e., income, consumption, and property taxes).

The report addresses the following areas, across more than 50 jurisdictions (based on responses to questionnaires supplemented with publicly available materials):

  • The characterization and legality of virtual currencies;
  • The income tax consequences across the different stages of a virtual currency’s lifecycle, from creation to disposal;
  • The consumption and property tax treatment of virtual currencies;
  • Common tax policy challenges and emerging issues; and
  • Considerations for policymakers.

Continue Reading OECD Releases Report on Tax Policy Approaches and Gaps in the Taxation of Virtual Currencies

The IRS has released new guidance on the U.S. tax treatment of cryptocurrency for the first time since 2014. The guidance includes Revenue Ruling 2019-24, which provides guidance on the tax treatment of hard forks. The IRS also released a series of FAQs covering a variety of topics that expand on Notice 2014-21.

Revenue Ruling 2019-24

Revenue Ruling 2019-24 generally concludes on two scenarios involving hard forks. A hard fork occurs when a blockchain undergoes a protocol change resulting in a permanent diversion from the legacy or existing blockchain, which may result in the creation of a new cryptocurrency on a new distributed ledger in addition to the legacy cryptocurrency on the legacy distributed ledger. In the first scenario, the cryptocurrency blockchain experiences a hard fork but the taxpayer does not receive units of a new cryptocurrency, and in the second scenario, the taxpayer receives units of new cryptocurrency “as a result of an airdrop of a new cryptocurrency following the hard fork.” The Revenue Ruling concludes that the taxpayer does not have income in the first scenario. However, in the second scenario, the taxpayer has ordinary income because he has experienced an accession to wealth. The income arises at the time of the airdrop because the taxpayer is, at that time, able to exercise dominion and control over the forked cryptocurrency.Continue Reading IRS Releases New Cryptocurrency Guidance

The IRS has confirmed that it has begun sending letters to taxpayers with virtual currency transactions that potentially failed to report income and pay the resulting tax from virtual currency transactions or did not report their transactions properly. In the announcement, IRS Commissioner Chuck Rettig says that “The IRS is expanding our efforts involving virtual currency, including increased use of data analytics. We are focused on enforcing the law and helping taxpayers fully understand and meet their obligations.”

The IRS identified the taxpayers receiving these letters through various ongoing IRS compliance efforts, likely including customer information that the IRS received last year after successfully enforcing a John Doe summons against Coinbase. The IRS has said that it expects more than 10,000 taxpayers will receive these letters by the end of August.Continue Reading IRS Stepping Up Cryptocurrency Enforcement Efforts

Bipartisan members of the House are advocating for more clarity in the tax law as it relates to taxation of cryptocurrency.

First, on April 9, Representative Warren Davidson (R-OH), a member of the House Financial Services Committee, reintroduced legislation that would provide clarity on certain tax and securities law issues related to cryptocurrency.  The bill, entitled the “Token Taxonomy Act of 2019,” resembles the original bill that Davidson introduced in the 115th Congress with Congressional Blockchain Caucus co-chair Darren Soto (D-FL).  The 2019 version of the bill is co-sponsored by Representatives Soto, Josh Gottheimer (D-NJ), Ted Budd (R-NC), Scott Perry (R-PA), and Tulsi Gabbard (D-HI) (who has announced she is running for President).

Davidson said in a statement that “[t]he Token Taxonomy Act is the key to unlocking blockchain technology in America.  Without it, the U.S. is surrendering its innovative origins and ownership of the digital economy to Europe and Asia.”

The bill would enact a number of new tax provisions. 
Continue Reading Congress Weighs In on Cryptocurrency Taxation

After a year-long fight with the IRS on turning over customer data, Coinbase both won and lost.  It won in that the court significantly narrowed the type of information that it was ordered to turn over to the IRS.  It lost in that it was still required to turn over data on approximately 13,000 customers.  For the 13,000 customers this means that the IRS may now be contacting you to let you know that you may owe additional tax.
Continue Reading Information on 13,000 Coinbase Customers Turned Over to IRS – Was Your Information Among Them?